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Cutting a stacked cake

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I will be doing my first stacked wedding cake in a little less than 2 weeks. It is a 4 tiered stacked, 16",12"10",8". The bride wants to use the top tier. How do I go about cutting the cake? Do I unassemble the stacks or will it be stable enough to cut while it's assembled? Thanks for any advise.
Missy
The "fabfour" includes:

Erin 12/28/99
Brett 5/13/01
Brady 2/13/04
Avery 2/28/07
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The "fabfour" includes:

Erin 12/28/99
Brett 5/13/01
Brady 2/13/04
Avery 2/28/07
Reply
post #2 of 19
I'd unassemble it to cut .. I wouldn't try cutting it assembled at all.
Cheryl a/k/a ntertayneme (n-ter-tayne-me)
www.legateaux.com
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Cheryl a/k/a ntertayneme (n-ter-tayne-me)
www.legateaux.com
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post #3 of 19
I have never seen a cake disassembled before cutting...it usually is stable the way it is...besides all the weddings I have been to, I cant say the table had enough room to put layers of cakeson it.... I would just take off the top tier, put it away, and then cut....
post #4 of 19
By unassemble, I meant to take the top layer off to save if the bride wants it, then start cutting the next tier on top.. after that tier is served, then the next tier, then so on so forth .. I didn't mean to unassemble the entire cake .. lol.. sorry for the confusion
Cheryl a/k/a ntertayneme (n-ter-tayne-me)
www.legateaux.com
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Cheryl a/k/a ntertayneme (n-ter-tayne-me)
www.legateaux.com
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post #5 of 19
I am such a dingdong...I should have known thats what you meant... but since I dont do wedding cakes, I wasnt sure if there was a right way to do it or not.. and I noticed after reading my last post on here, I need to correct a little.. by adding..."isnt it???" icon_lol.gif
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by flayvurdfun

I have never seen a cake disassembled before cutting...it usually is stable the way it is...besides all the weddings I have been to, I cant say the table had enough room to put layers of cakeson it.... I would just take off the top tier, put it away, and then cut....



Believe it or not, some do take the cake apart tier by tier, but they take it to a back room and then cut it there...
Its always about cake!!
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Its always about cake!!
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post #7 of 19
Hhmn, interesting, I have never heard of anyone cutting the cake while assembled unless they didn't know what they were doing. Seriously. At reception halls, professional servers always remove the cake to the kitchen after the ceremonial cake slice is done and completely dissassemble the cake before cutting it. If you cut a cake while assembled you are putting extra pressure on each tier. This will likely cause the cakes to stick to the boards and ruin the top icing of the cakes below.
The top tier is usually removed and boxed if being saved or cut. Then if there is room, the whole cake is disassembled. Otherwise each cake is removed and cut and then the next one removed and cut.
That is how a stacked cake is supposed to be professionally cut.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrellyCakes

The top tier is usually removed and boxed if being saved or cut. Then if there is room, the whole cake is disassembled. Otherwise each cake is removed and cut and then the next one removed and cut.
That is how a stacked cake is supposed to be professionally cut.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes



Yep, that's what I have seen and I replied to her the same thing... well, in shorter words...

I thought it was just me that had seen done this way... icon_surprised.gif
Its always about cake!!
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Its always about cake!!
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post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by MariaLovesCakes

Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrellyCakes

The top tier is usually removed and boxed if being saved or cut. Then if there is room, the whole cake is disassembled. Otherwise each cake is removed and cut and then the next one removed and cut.
That is how a stacked cake is supposed to be professionally cut.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes



Yep, that's what I have seen and I replied to her the same thing... well, in shorter words...

I thought it was just me that had seen done this way... icon_surprised.gif


Heehee, MariaLovesCakes,
everyone replies in shorter words, than I do, haha! Hhmn, still have the record for longest posts on Wilton, heehee! Get out the duct tape!
tapedshut.gif Hugs Squirrelly
post #10 of 19
I have always cut the cakes when they are assembled. Everyone at the wedding here like to watch the cake being cut. I have never brought the cake back to the kitchen. I guess that's more formal weddings. LOL~ I don't think there is a right or wrong way to cut them. My aunt has shown me how to cut cakes & wow it's so nice!! The icing under the board is still on the cake below~ Pretty cool! If I could explain it I would but it's something that I would have to show. Sorry~
"Learn from a turtle... it only makes progress when it sticks it's neck out"
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"Learn from a turtle... it only makes progress when it sticks it's neck out"
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post #11 of 19
Actually Turtle, there is a right and wrong way. Not critiquing, if it works for you that is great. But the thing is, you have different kinds of fillings and icings being used. Plus there are dowels to remove and such. For a cake that is not stacked it isn't an issue, but a stacked cake can slide or squish the cake below etc. So professionally, it is supposed to be disassembled.
The cakes are removed to the kitchen whether stacked or not when professionally served. This is again a matter of the guests not seeing the assembly items, the little pieces that don't get served or ones that get messed up, or icing and crumbs on the table and such. Plus there is an opportunity to smooth down any icing issues with a knife without folks gawking, haha.
But the rule of thumb is to always dissassemble a cake before serving, that is just the standard and always has been.
Like you said, if you haven't been to a formal wedding, you are likely not aware. Unfortunately some servers are not aware either and sometimes there are disastrous results.
Sometimes each layer is removed separately to the kitchen, or each one is removed separately at the same time. Sometimes the whole cake is placed on a dolly and moved. A lot depends on the size of the cake and difficulty moving it.
I guess it isn't considered good manners to see folks pulling out dowels and such and making a bit of a mess.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes
post #12 of 19
I agree that a very formal wedding you should go to the kitchen. Here we just make a mess & serve the cake because everyone's lips are smacking!! LOL!! I've been to plenty of formal weddings & they did do everything in the kitchen then the served the cake. It is nice w/ out the mess LOL!!
"Learn from a turtle... it only makes progress when it sticks it's neck out"
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"Learn from a turtle... it only makes progress when it sticks it's neck out"
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post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for everyone's answers. The problem is this is an outside reception. The tent is in front of the house and of course the kitchen is located in the back of the house. Most people around here cut while assembled but I am scared to because it is so much weight on the bottom cake. I guess I'll make that decision when the time comes.
Thanks again!!!
Missy
The "fabfour" includes:

Erin 12/28/99
Brett 5/13/01
Brady 2/13/04
Avery 2/28/07
Reply
The "fabfour" includes:

Erin 12/28/99
Brett 5/13/01
Brady 2/13/04
Avery 2/28/07
Reply
post #14 of 19
Heehee, Turtlelady and it is even nicer if you aren't the one having to make the mess and serve the darn cake, haha! I hate those plastic disposable gloves and how your nose always wants to run as soon as you put them on to start cutting the darn cake.
Gosh I don't know how many times I make a cake for something and get to serve it up too. Geesh why even bother to dress up for these things. Hhmn, that gives me an idea, next time, I am going to tell the folks that if I, the maker and a guest, have to serve, I am going to wear track pants and an ugly t-shirt, haha!
Oh gosh and please explain to me why anyone would spend a fortune on an anniversary party and then buy the cheapest and flimsiest of paper plates, you know the kind, they fold up in the centre when you try to carry them, geesh! Hhmn, how many times have you been handed one of those little plastic knifes to cut a cake? Haha, I think we should all keep a change of clothes, an apron and a proper knife and server and some good paper plates or china in the back of the car, haha!
A friend of mine did a cake for a formal wedding. The person stuck with cutting the cake was new staff, he actually tried to cut the big ones in wedges while the cake was all attached. Heehee, picture that, a 16 inch round cake, 8 inch deep wedge, but skinny. Good thing one of the other servers went to the manager, haha!
I remember one Wilton post where the mother of the bride insisted that the round cakes be cut in wedges so each person would get the same amount of icing, hhmn!
Ahh, it is never dull that is for sure! If only all brides went for cakes on separate pedestals, it would make life so much easier, haha!
Hugs Squirrelly
post #15 of 19
No doubt Squirrelly! I just did my 1st wedding cake on pedestals July 2nd. It was the easiest cake I ever had to cut! And pretty too! I'll post it once I get my scanner fixed!

I have a hard time keep my fingers out of my mouth when I get icing on them!!! My instructor would slap my hands when I would do that!! LOL!! I just can't help it!!

I really don't like cutting the cakes I do. I would rather have my aunt come w/ me & do it!! Like I said earlier she is very good at cutting cakes!
"Learn from a turtle... it only makes progress when it sticks it's neck out"
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"Learn from a turtle... it only makes progress when it sticks it's neck out"
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