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Salted vs Unsalted - Page 2

post #16 of 21
I prefer a little popcorn salt...it does seem to make the sweetness not TOO sweet ...but I also use salted butter sometimes too and just add less of my own salt.
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post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrellyCakes

Well the unsalted butter is better for some icings, but for a decorator's buttercream, I can't see paying extra for it, especially if folks add salt anyway to the icing and most especially if they are going to the expense of buying an artificial butter flavouring.
Haha, but you know, we are all different and have different opinions on the subject.
Interesting, I thought Blue Bonnet only made margarine, I guess that is because in Canada, they don't sell Blue Bonnet butter. At least I have never seen it.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes



Well, not that you mentioned it, I looked at it to make sure, and it says that it "bakes like butter" but without the cholesterol. It doesn't say its margarine, though.... icon_lol.gif

I have used Blue Bonnet on all my recipes, even on Swiss buttercream and it tastes really good .... icon_smile.gif
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Its always about cake!!
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post #18 of 21
In Canada, margarine has to state that it is margarine right in the name.
Generally margarine has too much moisture in it to use for a decorator icing. I say generally because though it isn't recommended I know one or two people that use it with no problem.
I know Kiddiekakes uses margarine, I believe she uses tub margarine in her icing. Her icing is always perfect, so obviously it works really well for her.
Baking and an uncooked unheated icing are two different things. Generally for baking, the best margarine to use is the hard margarine sold in blocks, squares or sticks- as you see in the U.S. The tub margarine has too much moisture for baking although there are some recipes that are adjusted for use with this type of margarine.
Margarine was created as a cheaper alternative to butter, during the war. Both margarine and butter have a lower melting and burning temperature. These fats react differently from shortening or cooking oil when placed on a hot element. When either butter or margarine are used for greasing a pan, the fat can be re-absorbed back into the cake causing cakes to stick to the pan and is one reason why this use is not recommended for most things.
When used in baking, the big difference is taste. If you are finding that it tastes good to you and works well, then always stick with what makes you happy.
Rule of thumb for cakes is that generally butter is better in a chocolate cake, shortening makes a lighter fluffier white cake, butter makes a more dense batter.
With decoratpr icing, all-shortening makes an easier to decorate with icing, an icing with both shortening and butter makes a more flavourful icing that doesn't melt as easy in your hands, an all-butter recipe makes the best tasting icing but is harder to handle and decorate with because of its higher moisture content and the fact that it has an 83F melting point whereas shortening has between an 89 and 99F melting point.
About the only thing I use margarine for other than on toast, is in the odd older cookie recipe I have and then, it is the hard margarine I use. I have tried a lot of recipes using either and I find that I prefer the taste of butter over margarine in nearly all cases.
It is a funny thing, when you switch exclusively to using butter, margarine tastes funny. When all you use is margarine, butter tastes funny. When you use salted or unsalted butter, each taste a bit odd when you switch between the two. I guess ours tastes change and we get used to one thing over another.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes
post #19 of 21
I'm still amazed that unsalted is more for some of you.

I'm happy to report that Costco has gone down even more to about $6.79 for 4lbs of butter - salted or unsalted. thumbs_up.gif
post #20 of 21
i like salted butter for baking and making uncooked buttercream. salt both balances the sweetness and enhances the flavour of many foods, even those things we might not think of as being improved by salt, like chocolate (i love salted chocolate). the most popular brand of chocolate chip cookies on the market is very salty.

squirrellycakes: if you're every feeling frisky and want to try a margarine in place of butter, give the lactancia brand (hydrogenated in the brown and white container) a try. i've used it in butter sponge cake batters with great success, and also in buttercream (instead of shortening, which i find unpalatable). it's less than half the price of cheap butter per pound. when it first came on the market they had tv commercials that claimed you could make shortbread with it (which was a vicious lie!!! icon_eek.gif ), but it did work well in other cookie recipes.
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post #21 of 21
I don't find margarine such an issue with cookies, but cakes, well, haha, it will take some convincing. Don't forget I have a lot of old cookbooks and margarine was used widely in those.
Unfortunately we cannot get our hands on the baker's margarines they use commercially, but in Quebec you can.
If I ever find it in the local stores, kiddo, I will try an experiment.
Hugs Squirrelly
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