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stacking cheesecakes

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 
my daughter wants me to make her wedding cake out of fondant covered cheesecakes....baking the cheesecake is not a problem i know how to do that.....what i don't know how to do is to stack them....also i plan on making them ahead of time and freezing them.....has anyone ever frozen fondant already on a cake...any help/suggestions will be greatly appreciated! thanks
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post #2 of 33
Wow! This sounds like a big task. I haven't ever heard of anyone trying this before. Are you planning to make a small one for practice a few weeks (or months) ahead to see how it holds up?

I know cheesecakes are heavy to begin with and the fondant will make it weigh a ton! I have only one suggestion that MIGHT help. Before you place each tier on a cakeboard, cover each cakeboard with contact paper so it is waterproof (at least to some degree) otherwise the boards will absorb the moisture in the cake and lose their strength, especially if you freeze them. When they come out there will be condensation to deal with.

Fondant can be refrigerated, but be warned that even with refrigeration, when you take it out it will develop condensation on it and will be as sticky as fly paper until it has time to air dry and come to room temp.

I don't know if any of this is helpful or not, ... good luck and I look forward to reading your posts as to how this turns out. Don't forget to post a photo when you finish!
post #3 of 33
Thread Starter 
yes i am planning on dong a test one....i will be doing this soon....as she is getting married in aug.

i see cheesecakes stacked on web pages where you can order them...so i know there must be a "secret" to it.....it is a big undertaking....but that is what she wants....

thanks for the suggestion of the contact paper...hadn't thought about that..
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post #4 of 33
is there anyway that you could be able to use the stands that go into the cakes and just have them very close to each other so that they almost appear stacked but not have the weight on top of the other cheesecake. I do not have experience with it but I was just wondering?
post #5 of 33
Good idea about the columns. I know Wilton sells columns called Hidden Pillars that are just a little taller than a tier. You actually set the feet of a plastic separator plate into each column and it only leaves a small space between the layers, just enough to lay a ring of flowers or somthing.
Here is a link to those pillars on Wilton.com so you can see what they look like. They are trimmable hollow plastic tubes:

http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=3E3119F0-475A-BAC0-5772682F766C019C

This way each tier is supported by a plastic plate rather than a cake board and they can be transported in separate boxes, and the boxes might be handy at the reception for taking home leftovers (if there are any!)
post #6 of 33
Thread Starter 
since i'm new at this....by stands... do you mean the pillars and the plastic cake round they fit into??

if so ....that would be a good idea.....do you think the pillars would be stable in the cheesecake ( as opposed to a regular cake)

i am sooooo glad i found this web site!!! i was really getting in a panic ...it makes me feel better knowing i have help!!
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post #7 of 33
Thread Starter 
thanks for the link for the hidden pillars......at least i feel i'm on the right track!
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post #8 of 33
How many tiers are you planning to make for your daughter's wedding?
There are many ways of approaching this task. Keeping the tiers on separate "plates" I think would be more stable than really stacking them with cakeboards between them. I am not sure how wooden dowels will work in cheesecake because any twisting of the tiers could cause them to cut through the cheesecake and fail to support the tiers above. There are other ways to make a tiered cake that might offer more support. Here are some more links to Wilton.com that show other possibilities:

Crystal Clear Cake Divider set is sturdy. Each tier sits on a sturdy round plate and clear pillars go through the tier below resting on either the table or the plastic plate in the next tier down.

http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=3E3143DE-475A-BAC0-52E8E24115E1EED0&fid=3E331070-475A-BAC0-59D1F5191FA0F3DB

Tall Tier Stand, you core each tier and assemble the tree like structure. Very stable and each tier is well supported:

http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=3E30BB93-475A-BAC0-52555DC793C1FEC1&fid=3E33109F-475A-BAC0-514197B5E889D67F

The general page of Wilton cake stands so you can see other photos of other types of stands:

http://www.wilton.com/store/site/department.cfm?id=3E305642-475A-BAC0-54CCA99DC6372101
post #9 of 33
Thread Starter 
i'm not sure how many tiers....since i wasn't sure how to do it....she wants the bottom to be a 14"........and then maybe a 10" and 8"


what do you think about this idea...using 12" crystal pillars that i ordered thru a local party supply store.....putting the 14" on the bottom.....and then using the 12" pillars next....and then putting the 10' next...with the 8"setting on the 10"......do you think that would be too heavy??

i was thinking that the space between the 14" and the 10" would leave room to decorate with a flower arrangement......thanks for all the links....
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post #10 of 33
I don't know where you got the 12" pillars from but I think they might be too wobbly to hold a 10" and 8" fondant covered cheesecakes. Remember the 14" cheesecake isn't really "supporting" the weight of the upper tiers but it does "steady" the pillars to some degree. 12" is pretty high up. I know the crystal look pillars only come in 7.5" and 9". Usually taller pillars are meant to be used with large diameter plates for fountains to be placed underneath, not for in between cake tiers.

Maybe someone who has actually worked with cheesecake could give you advice from EXPERIENCE, I am just extrapolating from working with dense cakes like pound-cake type tiers. Cheesecake is much creamier and soft than poundcake so my concern would be if someone bumped into the table and jarred the cake, ... would the heavy upper load twist a little and cause the bottom pillars to twist as a unit and collapse the upper ones.

Again, since I haven't actually done cheesecake, I can only guess. But you may be quite surprised at how heavy fondant is in addition to the cake! I don't feel I am being much help at this point. Maybe some of our more experienced folks will pick up the thread and give you sound advice.
post #11 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by dlp

i'm not sure how many tiers....since i wasn't sure how to do it....she wants the bottom to be a 14"........and then maybe a 10" and 8"


what do you think about this idea...using 12" crystal pillars that i ordered thru a local party supply store.....putting the 14" on the bottom.....and then using the 12" pillars next....and then putting the 10' next...with the 8"setting on the 10"......do you think that would be too heavy??

i was thinking that the space between the 14" and the 10" would leave room to decorate with a flower arrangement......thanks for all the links....



Quite frankly--I would be terrified to use 12" pillars to hold up the next two layers. Cheesecake is just not dense enough, imo, to handle all that weight and if somebody bumped into the cake table--YIKES!!

I haven't done a cheesecake wedding cake, but for sanity sake, I would think that the hidden pillars and a stacked construction would be your best bet. The hidden pillars are really wide and can, therefore support a heavy cake.

Also--about your sizing--you may want to go 14, 10 and 6 instead of 8. That way you have a 2" border around the edge of each cake and it will look more uniform.

When you make your test cake--check the consistency of the cheesecake after thawing. Whenever I have made cheesecake and frozen it, it seems somewhat softer when thawed. Also, I have never thawed a cheesecake on the counter--always in the fridge. Anyway--I'm wondering if the actual cheesecake itself, once thawed, will be able to handle the weight of the fondant.

Finally--I have always eaten cheesecake cold. How long is it going to sit out before serving? Are you concerned about spoilage? Just curious.

Let us know how it goes.

Lisa
post #12 of 33
I totally love cheesecakes and will like to know how it comes out.

Wandy
Totalmente adicta a la azucar oops!!!!
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post #13 of 33
Thread Starter 
i bought the 12" pillars at a store locally that sells cake decorating supplies.....along with a million other things...therefore no expert to ask if i was getting the right thing.......i can tell i did not!!! i'll have to find a different use for them!!!!!

i will be ordering the hidden pilllars....since i have not seen them in a store....that seems from those of you that know what you are doing to be the best method...

from what i've been told.....cheesecakes can be eaten at room temp..... but i can tell i will have to work out the timing from refrig to the room.......

i appreciate all the suggestions...if you have anymore....let me know.....this is something i really want to do for my daughter.....and when i was looking at all the web sites that sell cheesecake wedding cakes did not think it would be that difficult

you have all helped me prevent several mistakes already!!!!

since i have three months... i will be making several tests cakes...and i will fill everyone in on how it goes....
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post #14 of 33
This is just a suggestion, don't know if it will help or not but what if you used a dummy cake for the lower cakes and just had some cheesecakes in the back to actually cut up and serve? Or you could have the lower cake actually BE the cheese cake and then the two on top could be the dummy cakes that way they wouldn't be quite so heavy. Good luck with what ever you decide to do and don't forget to post those pictures!! icon_lol.gif

Charlotte
Have a great day.... and pass it on!!~~Charlotte
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Have a great day.... and pass it on!!~~Charlotte
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post #15 of 33
That is a good idea charlieinMO!
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