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Anyone know what this frosting is called?

post #1 of 34
Thread Starter 
I have a cake recipe which has a frosting recipe with it. Here's the ingredients:

In a saucepan add

1 cup milk
3 Tablespoons flour

cook and stir until thick and bubbly; remove from heat and cover until cool

In a mixer bowl beat

1 cup butter for 30 seconds

add 1 cup granulated sugar; beat until fluffy.

Add cooled milk mixture; beat until fluffy.

It's really light and fluffy.

Would like to know what it's called and if anyone has any experience with it.
I believe to have true inner peace one must finish what he starts everyday. So far today I've finished a chocolate cake & a pot of coffee!
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I believe to have true inner peace one must finish what he starts everyday. So far today I've finished a chocolate cake & a pot of coffee!
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post #2 of 34
It is similar to the Bakers Buttercream posted in the recipe section. I know it as the Waldorf icing. It is used on that red cake-whose name escapes me. It is delicious.
Cake. So many flavors, so little time.
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Cake. So many flavors, so little time.
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post #3 of 34
Yes, it is a Red Velvet Cake Frosting. Here is the larger version, slightly different, that I use.
2 cups milk
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2 cups of butter or again, hard margarine, softened
2 cups of granulated sugar (not icing sugar)
2 tsp. vanilla

Icing Method
Gradually whisk milk into flour into a small, heavy bottomed saucepan until smooth. Heat on low to low-medium heat and stir continuously until boiling and thickened. Then in mixing bowl beat butter or margarine on high and gradually add all granulated sugar until well incorporated. Then add vanilla and milk mixture and beat on high until light and fluffy. Fill and ice cake.
post #4 of 34
I tried this recipe and had a problem getting the flour/milk mixture to completely dissolve into the butter/sugar mixture. The icing was fluffy, and delicious, but you would end up with little tiny lumps in your mouth. Anyone have any suggestions? Did I let my milk/flour mixture get too thick. I did stir with a whisk while heating. There did not appear to be any lumps in the actual mixture (flour/milk) just couldn't get it to all dissolve into the butter/sugar.

TIA
post #5 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by lainee

I tried this recipe and had a problem getting the flour/milk mixture to completely dissolve into the butter/sugar mixture. The icing was fluffy, and delicious, but you would end up with little tiny lumps in your mouth. Anyone have any suggestions? Did I let my milk/flour mixture get too thick. I did stir with a whisk while heating. There did not appear to be any lumps in the actual mixture (flour/milk) just couldn't get it to all dissolve into the butter/sugar.

TIA


Not sure which one you tried, but the one I added, follow the method. I put the flour that I sift first, into the pot and very gradually whisk the milk in before it goes on the heat, that makes a big difference. Follow the rest of the method except just before you add this milk flour mixture to the rest of the icing mixture, press it through a fine sieve and if there are any lumps, you won't get them in the icing. Hope that helps!
Hugs Squirrelly
post #6 of 34
How thick should you let the flour/milk mixture get when you heat it?
post #7 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by lainee

How thick should you let the flour/milk mixture get when you heat it?


Haha, I understand what you mean, it isn't an exact science is it? Well what happens is while you are whisking it, you will feel it thickening and it will sort of splat bubble, the way oatmeal or a cooked pudding does, for lack of a better term. Really you want to get it off the heat before the bottom burns, so once you feel it thickening, like pudding and once it is splatting or bubbling. Does that help at all?
Hugs Squirrelly
post #8 of 34
Thanks squirrelly that makes since. I will definitely try pushing it through a seive to get the lumps out, I think my problem was letting it get too thick. I love the flavor, but was afraid of what it might look like if I tried to color it and certainly wouldn't want to have people commenting on the lumps. LOL I just bake for family and friend right now, but still.
post #9 of 34
old method I use to this day for combining flour w/ milk PRIOR to cooking to (as in gravies!)

put flour and mik in clean jar or similar container w/ tight fitting lid.

shake, shake, shake!!! no lumps every time...and so much eaiser that trying to whisk in gently.
Keep on cakin'!
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Keep on cakin'!
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post #10 of 34
Great idea Doug, thanks.
post #11 of 34
I put the flour and milk in the blender and whirl it just to make sure there are no lumps. After it's cooked to thick pudding texture, the mixure is cooled until it is really cold and thick. And I do mean THICK...you could stand a spoon up in it easily. At that point, it's beaten with the fat. My recipe calls for Crisco, but at least half butter would probably taste even better.

Be sure to place plastic wrap directly on the surface of the stuff as it is cooling. Otherwise, you will get a disgusting "skin" on the top. The skin won't dissolve and will also contribute to lumps.
Everything's better with sugar on it!
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Everything's better with sugar on it!
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post #12 of 34
How long do you let the mixture cool before adding it to the butter/sugar? I think another problem I had was, I stuck it in the freezer and it was almost like gelatin. Should I just let it cool at room temp for a few minutes while beating the butter and sugar?
post #13 of 34
I am looking for a recipe that is good for piping and can stay unrefigerated, like crisco buttercream. Also has anyone used this under fondant.

Thanks! (I just love this forum!!!)
post #14 of 34
The one I make is really, really cold. Chill over night if possible. I don't think the fat would hold up if it weren't.
Everything's better with sugar on it!
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Everything's better with sugar on it!
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post #15 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

old method I use to this day for combining flour w/ milk PRIOR to cooking to (as in gravies!)

put flour and mik in clean jar or similar container w/ tight fitting lid.

shake, shake, shake!!! no lumps every time...and so much eaiser that trying to whisk in gently.



I do kind of the same, I heat the milk in a glass measuring cup to a little more than "warm" and then add the flour. I use the (spring-like) egg beater and beat it until completely mixed, then pour it into a pot to finish and no lumps. icon_wink.gif

kos
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