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Sugar Beer Bottles

post #1 of 344
Thread Starter 
Thank you so much for all who were interested in my beer cake - sorry this has taken so long - between hockey tournaments and a very sick computer (that is STILL sick) I figured I'd better get this up best I can and add the pictures in later once the other computer is back up and running. When I can add the pictures I will PM Heath about turning this into a real How To article.

First thank you to DianeLM, her directions got me started, and I modified them to come up with this method that worked for me. My apologies to all you true sugar artists! This was my first attempt at sugar work, so these may not be perfect instructions, but at least I know they worked for a rookie like me LOL! The molds and bottles can be done in one day, for best results though, plan on 2 days for overnight drying of your latex mold.

Instructions for Sugar Beer Bottles

Remove label and wash the bottle you want to mold, fit a cork wrapped in plastic into the top so that it is even and flat with the top of the bottle. You may have to cut the cork to size first, then wrap in plastic and insert into the top of the bottle. If you do not use the plastic you may get bits of cork in the top of your mold. This will not harm your mold.

Using Rubber Latex (paint several coats over the entire bottle (except the bottom of course), letting it dry in between coats. It is best to let it sit over night after the final coat, but I have made and used a mold in one day.

Once it has dried thorouly begin lifting the mold from around the bottom of the bottle, loosening it all the way around.

Roll the mold off the bottle, do not worry if it begins to stick to itself a bit, it will pull apart. To roll the mold completely off the bottle it will most likely turn inside out. Simply use a mixing spoon to push it right side out. As the mold cures more over time it will stop sticking to itself.

Using any kind of modeling clay, make a half bottle mold using the same bottle, this will be the support for your latex mold. If the mold tilts the top of the bottle downwards at bit this helps, I did not think to do this when I made my first mold.

Rest the latex mold in the clay mold and then prepare your sugar.

Mix ½ cup sugar and ½ light corn syrup in a two cup glass measuring cup and place in microwave. Microwave the mixture for 6 minutes at 50%. then micro at full power for another 2-3 minutes, depending on how dark you want your bottle. It will continue to darken a bit once you remove it from the microwave.

Carefully pour the mixture into the mold a little at a time, rotating the latex mold slowly to evenly coat the mold, letting it rest in the clay mold to keep its shape. The latex will be hot to the touch, so gloves or potholders are needed. Once you have coated the mold, continue to pour the sugar into the mold and continue to rotate until you have used all the sugar.

Once the sugar has cooled, remove the mold from the sugar bottle the same way you did from the real bottle, loosen the bottom, and roll the mold off the bottle. When you get to the neck give it a gentle tug and it will come free.

I was able to make six bottles in one afternoon with only one mold. If you have any trouble with the neck of the bottle you can always wrap it in gold foil like some of the fancy imported beers!

I made my labels in Fireworks, but you could use any program like Photoshop, Word, whatever is comfortable for you. If you are not selling the cakes and do not have to worry about a copywrite you could even copy actual beer labels from a Google search and size them in any similar program.

I printed them on regular paper first to test the size. Once I was satisfied with the design I printed them onto edible sheets and cut them to size. A few seconds in the freezer and they separate easily from the backing paper and I attached them with a bit of corn syrup. If you do not have an edible printer you can always make paper labels and stick them on with corn syrup as well. Just let everyone know not to eat them!

I realize there could be some concern of latex allergies, I am not sure to what extent the latex will transfer to the sugar. If you do not want to use rubber latex for your molds these sites also have mold making materials that may work for you instead. If you use something like the Silicone Plastique I would think you could mold the plastique completely around the bottle, then once it cures cut it in half to release the bottle making 2 half bottles that could then fit back together. Band them together with rubber bands and pour the sugar into the mold, rotating to coat it. Once the sugar hardens you could then release the bottle from the 2 molds. I think I would have tried this if I had more time to order the Plastique.

http://www.culinart.net/silicone.html

http://www.fineartstore.com/cgistore/store.cgi?page=/new/product.html&setup=1&ida=18420&idp=17187&his=0%7C17187&cart_id=_RT4bgrVbYPar6zgx.792

http://www.chefrubber.com/

I hope these make sense and at least point some of you in the right direction to start making your own bottles.
Laura
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Laura
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post #2 of 344
Thanks for taking the time to write this up for us, and thanks for the links. How was your experience with Chef Rubber? My experiences with them have been great. I have dealt with them from time to time. When I call them on the telephone, the CS people are very courteous, knowledgeable about the product line, I think their prices are great, and they can get my items to me overnight via FedEx.

Theresa icon_smile.gif
post #3 of 344
Thanks for the information. Dianelm sent me the directions also. I can now use both of yours to make the bottle.
Your cake is awesome. But what I loved most was the hunk of a bartender standing to the side. You should have just taken a picture of him and posted it on here.
post #4 of 344
Now that's brilliant! Thanks so much for sharing the instructions! icon_smile.gif
~Val~
And yes.... I am shaped like <--- that M&M... cute huh?
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~Val~
And yes.... I am shaped like <--- that M&M... cute huh?
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post #5 of 344
Thanks for the instructions! Maybe one day I can make one of these bottles thumbs_up.gif
post #6 of 344
Thread Starter 
julz71 said
Quote:
Quote:

But what I loved most was the hunk of a bartender standing to the side. You should have just taken a picture of him and posted it on here



You are soooo right! I DO have an EXCELLENT photo of him as well! It was sooo sad to have to block out his face icon_rolleyes.gif

He was such a hottie and such a dear as well.

I haven't actually bought from Chef Rubber yet, but I have them bookmarked in case I need anything - looks like great stuff, glad to know they are good to work with.

Now I hope to see Beer Bottle cakes being posted for St. Pat's day!! I have another one to make for Saturday, so that really makes having the molds worth it thumbs_up.gif
Laura
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Laura
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post #7 of 344
What a great tutorila SweetResults, thank you for taking the time to do that. I have been wanting to try these for the longest time. I think with your help I can do this!
SHIRLEY
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SHIRLEY
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post #8 of 344
Question: Where can I buy the rubber latex you brush on? I'm not familiar with it. (GREAT cake, btw!)
Make Life Sweet...Eat Cake!
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Make Life Sweet...Eat Cake!
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post #9 of 344
Thread Starter 
I bought it at AC Moore in the sculpting program, probably can get it at Michaels too.
Laura
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Laura
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post #10 of 344
Thanks. I'll check Michael's.
Make Life Sweet...Eat Cake!
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Make Life Sweet...Eat Cake!
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post #11 of 344
Thanks for the info.
post #12 of 344
wow this is awesome! Your cakes are unbelievable, so real.
thumbs_up.gifthumbs_up.gif
post #13 of 344
Thanks so much for posting this!
"A balanced diet is cake in each hand!"
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"A balanced diet is cake in each hand!"
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post #14 of 344
Thank you so much for taking the time to write such a great tutorial. I absolutely cannot wait to try this. DH was complaining the other day that I have never made HIM a cake of his own. His birthday is 4th of July and I am already thinking about how to use these. Thanks again!
post #15 of 344
This is a great tutorial and I can't wait til I get a chance to try it.
Anybody with artistic ability can make a cake look beautiful, but it takes someone with the heart and soul of a "true baker" to get in the kitchen, bake from scratch, and make that cake taste good.
~~~~Deeva~~~~
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Anybody with artistic ability can make a cake look beautiful, but it takes someone with the heart and soul of a "true baker" to get in the kitchen, bake from scratch, and make that cake taste good.
~~~~Deeva~~~~
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