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OK, I'M A BUTTER USER NOW~ - Page 4

post #46 of 73
Well I'd like to use Butter because it does give it a better taste but at $3.99 a pound here(Canada) and you consider you use half of it to make one batch of icing....costs can get up there!! I buy the large 6lb flat tub of Margarine as the whole flat is $5.49 but Yeah...if Butter was cheaper....I'd use it all the time!!

Busy Bakin Kakes For Kids!!!

Mom to Mitchell 13 yrs and Delaney 11 yrs

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Busy Bakin Kakes For Kids!!!

Mom to Mitchell 13 yrs and Delaney 11 yrs

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post #47 of 73
Kiddiekakes

If you ever decide to buy butter you could incorporate that cost into your cake price. Just a suggestion.
post #48 of 73
Hi MOuse, should have been more specific, sorry, the powdered creamer doesn't contain milk as per the site - they are dairy product free. An excerpt from the site follows.

Does COFFEE-MATE contain lactose?

COFFEE-MATE Liquid and Powder do not contain any lactose they are non-dairy, lactose-free products.

COFFEE-MATE Latte Creations and Half and Half products both contain milk and lactose.

I have a habit of referring to Coffeemate as the powdered kind, not the newer liquid creamer versions. The liquid newer modified flavoured versions are supposed to only have a shelf life of 7 days once opened according to the site.
Yes, Kiddiekakes makes lovely icing with the tub margarine, she is about the only person I know of that doesn't have problems with it due to the higher moisture contenct of the tub margarines, but obviously it works well for her because her cakes are wonderful.
I suppose a lot would have to do with the product you are using too.
The tub margarines are not meant to be in baked recipes unless specifically called for, generally when margarine can be used, it is meant to be the hard margarine, again due to the moisture content and also to how the heat affects the chemical breakdown of it.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes
post #49 of 73
Has anyone tried the 0 trans fat version of Crisco in their icing? It seems like it would be a healthier alternative. I was curious if it would work.
Birthdays are just nature's way of telling us to eat more cake.
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Birthdays are just nature's way of telling us to eat more cake.
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post #50 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by AgentCakeBaker

Do you use salted or unsalted for buttercream icing?



One should always use UNsalted butter for baking (unless salted is called for in recipe), and SALTED for eating/other cooking. icon_smile.gif
The Client doesn't generally understand the creative process we go through to make them a gorgeous confection ... it really IS more than "just" butter, eggs, and flour!
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The Client doesn't generally understand the creative process we go through to make them a gorgeous confection ... it really IS more than "just" butter, eggs, and flour!
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post #51 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by aobodessa

Quote:
Originally Posted by AgentCakeBaker

Do you use salted or unsalted for buttercream icing?



One should always use UNsalted butter for baking (unless salted is called for in recipe), and SALTED for eating/other cooking. icon_smile.gif

I dont think this is entirely true. It depends on each case. You can use either or in frosting or other things..
Becky D
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Becky D
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www.cakeconfections.net
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post #52 of 73
If you have a recipe for unsalted butter it usually says put an 1/8 t of salt in it.. So I just used salted & not worry about it~ ~TC~
"Learn from a turtle... it only makes progress when it sticks it's neck out"
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"Learn from a turtle... it only makes progress when it sticks it's neck out"
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post #53 of 73
Interesting debate. Here is the thing, being an old brawd of 50, haha, I can tell you that the older cookbooks and recipes, when they called for butter, well it generally meant salted butter - that would cover a time frame from around the 1950's until approximate 1990. But on the whole, a good cookbook should really have a section where they tell you what they mean when they call for butter, the size of eggs used in a recipe etc.
Cookbooks written during the first and second world war, generally we made with the idea of using cheaper more available ingredients.
Recipes and the ingredients called for, change with the times. At one time, the size of eggs used was medium, then at one time extra large and now generally the size used is large.
From about 1990 until present, well generally a lot of the cookbooks and recipes do call for unsalted butter and frequently also unbleached flour. This is a trend.
In Canada, it will soon be illegal to sell fat products that are composed of transfats, so we will see a new trend again as some recipes are adjusted.
It is generally wise to use what is called for and if a recipe calls for salted or unsalted butter use what is called for. If you cannot, then adjust the salt called for in your recipe to accomodate the salted butter that you are replacing the unsalted with and vice versa. This generally will not make any noticable difference in a recipe.
The longer you are around this earth you start to notice that cooking becomes very trendy with ideas catching on from different parts of the globe.
But honestly you cannot assume that a recipe means unsalted butter unless it states so and vice versa. It really isn't so much definitive as it is a sign of the times. Presently, newer recipes are likely being made with salted butter - but not always.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes
post #54 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrellyCakes


In Canada, it will soon be illegal to sell fat products that are composed of transfats, so we will see a new trend again as some recipes are adjusted.



All really interesting! I did not know this. Do you think that might be why Crisco came out with a 0 trans fat? Why are they illegal? Are they that bad for us. I'm beginning to think I better start experimenting with the 0 TS Crisco.
Birthdays are just nature's way of telling us to eat more cake.
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Birthdays are just nature's way of telling us to eat more cake.
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post #55 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by lisa

Has anyone tried the 0 trans fat version of Crisco in their icing? It seems like it would be a healthier alternative. I was curious if it would work.



Ever since I saw it in the stores, it is the only Crisco that I use (unless I need Butter-flavored, but I assume that they will be coming out with 0-TFA Buuter flavored soon)

It works just fine!
post #56 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by lisa

Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrellyCakes


In Canada, it will soon be illegal to sell fat products that are composed of transfats, so we will see a new trend again as some recipes are adjusted.



All really interesting! I did not know this. Do you think that might be why Crisco came out with a 0 trans fat? Why are they illegal? Are they that bad for us. I'm beginning to think I better start experimenting with the 0 TS Crisco.



there's is no need to "experiment" with it...I didn't find a whit of difference in my icing once I switched to it...

and yes - TFAs ARE that bad for you. Ever since the food industry started using partially hydrogenated fats (TFAs) and high-fructose corn syrup in everything (to save costs), obesity and heart disease rates have SKYROCKETED

And I'm not even going to get IN to what all the hormones pumped into our meat/dairy/egg supply has done to young girls!
post #57 of 73
Ain't that the truth, all of the playing around with food has led to high blood pressure and extreme obesity and heart attacks in young people!
Yes, trans-fats basically become artery clogging hard or solid fat when they are eaten and nothing dissolves them. Which is why they are being made illegal within the next few months here in Canada. I assume the U.S. will likely follow suit since I know this is a major problem also in the U.S.
I haven't had to buy any Crisco for a long time, so I don't know if this "0" trans-fat Crisco is available here. It will be interesting to see if the other high-ratio shortenings that are readily available in the U.S. also change to no trans-fats and interesting also to see how they affect the absorbtion rate of the sugar etc.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes
post #58 of 73
I've seen the 0 TF Crisco in our stores here. I was curious how it would hold up in icing. I've bought the 0 TF peanut butter. It tastes great...very natural but the oil separates from the peanut. It has to be stirred and kept refrigerated. I was afraid the Crisco would be the same way.
Birthdays are just nature's way of telling us to eat more cake.
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Birthdays are just nature's way of telling us to eat more cake.
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post #59 of 73
Heehee, when I was a kid all of the peanut butter did that, that was for some reason, what made it taste so great! Jack'n Jill peanut butter, yummy! Don't think you can get it anymore in Canada, but heck, I guess I will be happy if the "0" transfat ones do that, haha!
Is it all-natural without preservatives? Is that why the refridgeration or is it because of the no trans-fats?
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes
post #60 of 73
SquirrellyCakes...it is delicious. Smuckers makes it and it is all natural without perservatives. That probably is why it requires refrigeration. I didn't even think of that. I love the taste but it's really hard to stir after it's been refrigerated.
Birthdays are just nature's way of telling us to eat more cake.
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Birthdays are just nature's way of telling us to eat more cake.
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