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OK, I'M A BUTTER USER NOW~ - Page 3

post #31 of 73
Just wanted to add for everyone's information, the following:
Butter has a melting temperature of between 82.4 and 96.8 degrees farenheit.
Shortening has a melting temperature of between 98 and 110 degrees farenheit. You have to take into account the humidity factor and sunlight, direct or indirect. No direct sunlight on the cake.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes
post #32 of 73
Excuse me for asking. What is the different for blue bonnet and land o lakes?
Is one of them vegetarian?
post #33 of 73
Blue Bonnet is margarine (chemical imitation butter)
Land 'O Lakes is real butter (no imitation here)
"To solve any problem, here are three questions to ask yourself: First, what could I do? Second, what could I read? And third, who could I ask? ~ John Rohn"
"Action is the foundational key to all success. ~ Pablo Picasso"
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"To solve any problem, here are three questions to ask yourself: First, what could I do? Second, what could I read? And third, who could I ask? ~ John Rohn"
"Action is the foundational key to all success. ~ Pablo Picasso"
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post #34 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrellyCakes

will give you a much better result than using water as your liquid. Aways beat a recipe like this on low power, starting by softening your butter on low before adding your shortening. This gives you a better result.



I have found if I add water to my recipe (or any of the three I like to use) at all, it just curdles it (or looks curdled anyway). I have to add milk or some sort of milk products (creamer- heavy cream- evaporated milk- etc).
post #35 of 73
Me too Dawn, but I get E-mails from people that say they add water to the half butter and half shortening recipe, all the time and I cannot figure out why it works. I find the same issue when making a drizzle. GO figure why it works for some folks! Plus I cannot imagine why if you are adding butter, you wouldn't add milk or cream. I do find a difference too when you add 2% or skim milk, but it is a texture difference, not a curdling effect.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes
post #36 of 73
I have not really had a curdeling issue, but have always used milk or cream. I have just recently tried what Sharon Z has used which is coffeemate. Not the liquid. I take a cup of the coffeemate and comibine it with a cup of boiling water. Mix and the refriderate. So far good results.
Becky D
cakeconfections@gmail.com
www.cakeconfections.net
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Becky D
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post #37 of 73
I'm one of those people who uses water with the half shortening/half butter recipe. I started making BC using milk. It was fine. Then I decided to try warm water in place of the milk. I had read that it would make the BC smoother. It did and I stuck with it. I think I could just as easily replace the warm water with warm milk but I can't tell a difference. I don't know why water doesn't work for some.
Birthdays are just nature's way of telling us to eat more cake.
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Birthdays are just nature's way of telling us to eat more cake.
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post #38 of 73
I agree, SQC, the thinner milk is much like adding water. It has to be thick.

Becky- I believe you are just making liquid cream when you add the water. If this works for you I'll have to try it. I would think it would be cheaper than buying the liquid form. But it has to produce the same or better icing for me. I love going cheap, but not at the expense of the final results. I like the idea of powder because I would think I could stock up on different flavors that way.
post #39 of 73
Likely the heat of the water melts the butter to some degree and makes it blend in better. I can see it with the edible oil products like coffeemate and they were originally designed to blend in and not separate and perhaps the additives have an effect also. Perhaps because of the amount of shortening added too. It is interesting, but if you think about it, when you grease a frying pan, heat it up and then put droplets of water on it, they bounce away from the grease, like the old saying about oil and water not mixing.
Interesting about the warmed water making a smoother icing. I don't know if you add salt or meringue powder to your icing, but I would think this is a factor too.
It is like using a high ratio shortening as oppposed to Crisco. Well, the high ratio shortenings can absorb the sugar better, of course the finer your powdered sugar the better. But this is what makes for a smoother icing. Of course if you use a really good high ratio shortening and then use a poorer quality powdered sugar, one that is not fine enough, well you are going to lost the effect.
I can tell you that when you make a drizzle from water and sugar or milk and sugar, you don't have a problem, but introduce softened butter to it, not melted, but softened, and it curdles, or appears curdled.
Actually I do find a big difference in taste, even when milk is used as opposed to cream etc. Maybe some people are more sensitive to taste, I don't know. I know that if I use all cream instead of part cream, part whole milk, I can taste the difference along with see a difference in texture. If I sift my icing sugar before using it as opposed to using it unsifted, I can feel a difference in the texture too.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes
post #40 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by cali4dawn



Becky- I believe you are just making liquid cream when you add the water. If this works for you I'll have to try it. I would think it would be cheaper than buying the liquid form. But it has to produce the same or better icing for me. I love going cheap, but not at the expense of the final results. I like the idea of powder because I would think I could stock up on different flavors that way.



It is thicker then water, and I suppose if you add more powder then water it will be creamier. I agree about cheaper. I just have the non flavor for now. But it seems to be working and after I make a few more cakes with continued success, i will start to get powder cofee cremers that are flavored. That would be great because the shelf life would be so much better and I would not have to worry about it going bad.
Becky D
cakeconfections@gmail.com
www.cakeconfections.net
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Becky D
cakeconfections@gmail.com
www.cakeconfections.net
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post #41 of 73
I don't add salt or meringue powder. I use unsalted butter. I've been thinking about trying the cream in place of water though to see if I notice a difference. It is interesting though that milk is mostly water too. If milk works for you...you would think water should too.
Birthdays are just nature's way of telling us to eat more cake.
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Birthdays are just nature's way of telling us to eat more cake.
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post #42 of 73
Lisa, it is likely due to the butterfat content of the milk or cream, that it mixes in without separating.
Just wanted to say that a lot of folks are using the flavoured coffee creamers in their icing, I have seen many posts regarding this.
When you are using Coffeemate you are using an edible oil product, there is no cream or milk in it at all. It is not powdered milk.
Hugs Squirrelly Cakes
post #43 of 73
Actually...looked on coffemate's website...you are both right..sort of..
Coffeemate liquid French Vanilla flavour, the third ingredient is an oil product and the fourth ingredient is a milk derivative (but not a source of lactose).
Coffemate powdered French Vanilla flavour, the second ingredient is dehyrdated oil product and the fourth ingredient is a milk derivative (but not a source of lactose).
"To solve any problem, here are three questions to ask yourself: First, what could I do? Second, what could I read? And third, who could I ask? ~ John Rohn"
"Action is the foundational key to all success. ~ Pablo Picasso"
Reply
"To solve any problem, here are three questions to ask yourself: First, what could I do? Second, what could I read? And third, who could I ask? ~ John Rohn"
"Action is the foundational key to all success. ~ Pablo Picasso"
Reply
post #44 of 73
Ive added hot water to my buttercream thinking that may be the problem... but it still separates and looks curdled... so I don't think so. But I do think adding the water to the creamer is making the artificial creamer that we are now buying in liquid form. I've always considered the stuff artificial and non-dairy....
post #45 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by cali4dawn

Ive added hot water to my buttercream thinking that may be the problem... but it still separates and looks curdled... so I don't think so. But I do think adding the water to the creamer is making the artificial creamer that we are now buying in liquid form. I've always considered the stuff artificial and non-dairy....



Not hot water...it has to be just warm to the touch. Hot would melt everything down too much. Maybe the recipe I'm using is more stable. I'm pretty sure I could add just about any liquid and it would come out fine. I've never curdled a batch of buttercream. Bet that's yuck!
Birthdays are just nature's way of telling us to eat more cake.
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Birthdays are just nature's way of telling us to eat more cake.
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