Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cookies! › Fed up with dry foam!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Fed up with dry foam! - Page 2

post #16 of 32
well, I do hope people would WASH the pan afterwards....the pans, being metal aren't going to absorb much of anything. Pretty impervious.

the tip I saw said to even go so far as to light grease the pan so the foam would pop out easily.

If really fanatical about it, line pan w/ plastic wrap..then foam

Personally, I'd be more worried about the fumes while curing, and would only want to do this in a very well ventilated area.
Keep on cakin'!
Reply
Keep on cakin'!
Reply
post #17 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

well, I do hope people would WASH the pan afterwards....the pans, being metal aren't going to absorb much of anything. Pretty impervious.

the tip I saw said to even go so far as to light grease the pan so the foam would pop out easily.

If really fanatical about it, line pan w/ plastic wrap..then foam

Personally, I'd be more worried about the fumes while curing, and would only want to do this in a very well ventilated area.


See that is part of what I remember from working with the original stuff years ago. I know that the products have changed a lot because I remember when they only had the stuff that hugely expanded, haha, I remember this because friends put so much around a window, the window wouldn't open anymore.
Some of the Wilton pans are easily ruined, haha, ask anyone who has put a character pan in the dishwasher.
I just wonder if when people use a combination dummy and real cake if there is any risk.
Anyway, it is an interesting topic, I have often wondered if you could use this foam for things like that.
Like I said, it could be all perfectly safe these days, products change so much.
Hugs Squirrelly
post #18 of 32
just read the label of the can of latex based foam I have...
it has only a 10% expansion rate...so have to fill anything 90% full and says it has water clean-up (even says all you need to do for skin contact is soap and water) and can be molded and tooled.

It's major warnings are fumes and explosions (propellant is BUTANE and PROPANE mix!!!) they emphasize doing it well ventelated, all flame and spark sources gone.

and I checked the MSDS (material safety data sheet) and it's main precautions were as listed above ....avoid anything that might spark a flame..... and suggested safety glasses (always a good idea anyway when working with building materials)

as for combining foam dummy w/ real... as others do, wrap dummy first in plastic wrap (after all, the styrofoam most use of dummies is NOT rated as food safe either) and then frost away. by the time it is frosted and put on cake board, etc. shouldn't be anymore a problem than regular styrofoam.
Keep on cakin'!
Reply
Keep on cakin'!
Reply
post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrellyCakes

Some of the Wilton pans are easily ruined, haha, ask anyone who has put a character pan in the dishwasher.



dishwasher?????

what's that

mine are those two things at the end of my arms that mess up all my spelling and typing!
Keep on cakin'!
Reply
Keep on cakin'!
Reply
post #20 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrellyCakes

Some of the Wilton pans are easily ruined, haha, ask anyone who has put a character pan in the dishwasher.



dishwasher?????

what's that

mine are those two things at the end of my arms that mess up all my spelling and typing!


Haha, you are too funny kiddo!
Thanks for the information from the can of insulation. Haha, remember when they were not available in different expansion ratios, it was pretty funny then. People were over foaming everything Well, not really funny because they were bending window frames and such.
Haha, I didn't know what a dishwasher was for years either, haha! But once I got one, I quickly learned, haha! Hubby still prefers your method though.
Hugs Squirrelly
post #21 of 32
The Wilton folks recommend one of the ways to make the "dummy character cakes" is to do just that - fill the pan with the expanding foam to make a form. I would think they would have figured out if it wasn't a good idea or not before telling folks to do that. (??)
Knowledge is a candle that when shared, doubles the light, but the insecure person believes knowledge is a candle that is diminished when it is split between two wicks.
Reply
Knowledge is a candle that when shared, doubles the light, but the insecure person believes knowledge is a candle that is diminished when it is split between two wicks.
Reply
post #22 of 32
Thread Starter 
I have also seen a type of packing foam that squishes and then expands to the size of the container. I was doing product research in the begining and I ordered from a bouquet company. They used this white fowm that was sturdy enough to hold the sticks, but you could squish it and put in the container. Then, it would be secure.

However, since I can not come up with anyother name than "squishy packing foam" I have had little luck searching for it on the internet....

Any thoughts?

Also, my DH says that the foam stuff gets erally hard. So you wouold definately have to find a way to make the hole and then put stick in...

BTW, you guys are great...so very helpful and creative!
post #23 of 32
the aerosol foams will get hard, but not so hard a scredriver (phillips) or cut off piece of wire coat hanger wouldn't be able to make a hole in it.

I'd use the one the latex foams, tho' be careful about the fumes (note my earlier post)
Keep on cakin'!
Reply
Keep on cakin'!
Reply
post #24 of 32
I've used candy clay with a cookie bouquet as well as a candy bouquet. You don't have to completely fill the container with it, so you really only need enough to give you a good base to put your sticks into. One of the pluses to the candy clay is that you don't need to use anything else to add weight to the container like you do when you have a light weight container and styrofoam.

I also like the fact that it is edible and you don't have to worry about it coming in contact with your cookies or candies. Plus I like to use containers that the people can use after the bouquet is gone, such as candle holders or mugs, then they can easily remove the candy clay and it it.

The recipe I have for candy clay is one package of Wilton Candy Melts to 1/3 cup corn syrup. Melt the Candy Melts then stir in the corn syrup. Spread on a wax paper covered cookie sheet and let sit over night.
My Weight Loss Support Group is The Chunky Monkeys!
Reply
My Weight Loss Support Group is The Chunky Monkeys!
Reply
post #25 of 32
hmmmm....

well then forget the cookies and just give me a really big batch of dark chocolate candy clay!!!!......and it won't be going in any ol' mug/pot/etc.

(mine!...all mine!)
Keep on cakin'!
Reply
Keep on cakin'!
Reply
post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug

hmmmm....

well then forget the cookies and just give me a really big batch of dark chocolate candy clay!!!!......and it won't be going in any ol' mug/pot/etc.

(mine!...all mine!)



See added benifit to using it!! icon_wink.gif

I also like to add candies in the container as a little something extra. Red Hots or Conversational Candy Hearts work great for V-day. Jelly beans for Easter. Candy Corn for Halloween. icon_smile.gif
My Weight Loss Support Group is The Chunky Monkeys!
Reply
My Weight Loss Support Group is The Chunky Monkeys!
Reply
post #27 of 32
Thread Starter 
[quote="TexasSugar"]I've used candy clay with a cookie bouquet as well as a candy bouquet. You don't have to completely fill the container with it, so you really only need enough to give you a good base to put your sticks into. One of the pluses to the candy clay is that you don't need to use anything else to add weight to the container like you do when you have a light weight container and styrofoam.
quote]

Would you say that it is very heavy? I ship alot and I try to keep the weight down if possible.....Thanks for the recipe.

julia
post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by acookieobsession


Would you say that it is very heavy? I ship alot and I try to keep the weight down if possible.....Thanks for the recipe.



I guess it depends on how big your container is or how much you put in it. My containers aren't big, and I haven't used a full batch in one yet. Since it is just made up of candy melts and corn syrup it'd only be as heavy as the candy melts are.
My Weight Loss Support Group is The Chunky Monkeys!
Reply
My Weight Loss Support Group is The Chunky Monkeys!
Reply
post #29 of 32
k sounds like most ya'll have concerns about the foam junk in the pans n all. how bout this idea: carefully line the pan itself with the saran wrap or plastic wrap n such. That way everyone is happy the foam doesn't come into contact with any surfaces that you don't want it to or maybe even tinfoil would work for this. (to line the pan of course)
Look twice, save a life. Motorcylcles are
Everywhere!
ABATE of Colorado
Reply
Look twice, save a life. Motorcylcles are
Everywhere!
ABATE of Colorado
Reply
post #30 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadcrew

The Wilton folks recommend one of the ways to make the "dummy character cakes" is to do just that - fill the pan with the expanding foam to make a form. I would think they would have figured out if it wasn't a good idea or not before telling folks to do that. (??)


Yes kiddo, you are right, didn't know they were recommending it. Just check the can to be safe.
I have used styrofoam insulation pieces, some styrofoam peanuts with some tissue paper stuffed on top but then, I am not shipping.
For some things, I just make a tape grid or "frog" out of tape and place the sticks into the holes of the grid.
Hugs Squirrelly
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cookies!
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cookies! › Fed up with dry foam!