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flower cascades.

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
How do you do flower cascades on a tiered wedding cake? I know that the flowers are made individually with floral wire and tape but how do you put it all together on the cake? The books that I've looked at that show how to make the flowers never go into alot of details about draping it on the cake. Is there a book or something that anyone can recommend? Thanks in advance for the help.
Nazinga Aurich
Nazinga@ByNazinga.com
http://www.ByNazinga.com

"For custom cakes that delight the eye and palate"
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Nazinga Aurich
Nazinga@ByNazinga.com
http://www.ByNazinga.com

"For custom cakes that delight the eye and palate"
Reply
post #2 of 8
I make the cascades by taping them together and using the upside down cake pans as a guide for how the wires need to bend in order to get the right "flow"
post #3 of 8
Take one taped flower, hold another beside it but down a bit on the right, do another on the left side and continuing tapering them as you go. If you are doing filler flowers you would want to tape a few flowers together, then some of the filler flowers. I like to look at flower magazines or even Martha Stewart Weddings magazine in the bouquet section for ideas of design and color combinations.
SHIRLEY
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SHIRLEY
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post #4 of 8
I just did a cake last weekend that had a cascade of flowers on it. I also had no idea how to connect all of the ivy that I made.

One thing that I definately learned is...it's alot easier on the fingers if you use fine wire rather then thicker wire to put your flowers or ivy on.

I took the ivy on fine wire and put three of them together. I had the one in the middle a little higher then the ones on the sides. Then I used needle nosed pliars and twisted them together. I then used floral tape and started to tape them and as I got down the wire I would add a new leaf to each side.

For the flowers I used the heavier wire.

Also, when you use thinner wire you can really position the flowers and leaves alot easier.

I made close to 150 ivy leaves any only broke three of them using this method.

As far as how to place them on the cake. For this cake that I just did over the weekend it was up to me. Sometimes I think that makes it alot harder then if someone would just tell you what they want. Anyway, I started in the middle of the front of the cake and put a flower. Then I put one on the top rim of the cake and then on the bottom edge. Sort of in a very lazy "S" then I just start filling in.
~~*~~ You can have my mixer when you pry my dead cold fingers from around it ~~*~~
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~~*~~ You can have my mixer when you pry my dead cold fingers from around it ~~*~~
Reply
post #5 of 8
I just did a cake last weekend that had a cascade of flowers on it. I also had no idea how to connect all of the ivy that I made.

One thing that I definately learned is...it's alot easier on the fingers if you use fine wire rather then thicker wire to put your flowers or ivy on.

I took the ivy on fine wire and put three of them together. I had the one in the middle a little higher then the ones on the sides. Then I used needle nosed pliars and twisted them together. I then used floral tape and started to tape them and as I got down the wire I would add a new leaf to each side.

For the flowers I used the heavier wire.

Also, when you use thinner wire you can really position the flowers and leaves alot easier.

I made close to 150 ivy leaves any only broke three of them using this method.

As far as how to place them on the cake. For this cake that I just did over the weekend it was up to me. Sometimes I think that makes it alot harder then if someone would just tell you what they want. Anyway, I started in the middle of the front of the cake and put a flower. Then I put one on the top rim of the cake and then on the bottom edge. Sort of in a very lazy "S" then I just start filling in.
~~*~~ You can have my mixer when you pry my dead cold fingers from around it ~~*~~
Reply
~~*~~ You can have my mixer when you pry my dead cold fingers from around it ~~*~~
Reply
post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the help. I thought of another question though...maybe it's stupid but I want to be sure. Is it ok to have the wire and tape come in contact with the cake? I guess it must be right?

The reason I ask is, when you've wrapped the flowers together and are ready to put the cascade on the cake, do you just stick the end in the cake somewhere?

Maybe someone could do an article on it.
Nazinga Aurich
Nazinga@ByNazinga.com
http://www.ByNazinga.com

"For custom cakes that delight the eye and palate"
Reply
Nazinga Aurich
Nazinga@ByNazinga.com
http://www.ByNazinga.com

"For custom cakes that delight the eye and palate"
Reply
post #7 of 8
You could use a flower pick or straws, so there is no risk with wires touching cake. Put some fondant inside the pick/straw to hold the wires in place.
post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
good idea!
Nazinga Aurich
Nazinga@ByNazinga.com
http://www.ByNazinga.com

"For custom cakes that delight the eye and palate"
Reply
Nazinga Aurich
Nazinga@ByNazinga.com
http://www.ByNazinga.com

"For custom cakes that delight the eye and palate"
Reply
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