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Posts by Smash Cakery

Your problem was the single layer cardboard. It is a bit flexible, and not at all intended to support the intense weight of a three tiered cake. I would use three of those cardboards, tape them together to make a drum, and then stack the cake on top. Your construction appears fine- but the fact that the bottom tier split, is indicative of the board flexing when lifted up, and set down repeatedly. Next time use a drum, or a home made drum (the three boards together).
I definitely would not build a multi tiered cake without it being on it's drum when you start stacking the cake. I made the mistake one time of doing this with a small two tiered cake, and when I put a huge spatula under the bottom tier to lift the cake onto it's drum, the cake circle underneath the bottom tier buckled the slightest bit, causing my internal supports to shift, which caused the whole cake to collapse about an hour later. Don't risk it.   If you're worried...
Can you use royal icing to stencil I to a chilled buttercream cake? My concern is that the RI would bleed when the cake condensates after being taken out of the fridge for delivery and setup?
I just ganached a 5" cake that is 6" high (two 3" cakes, torted and stacked, filled with CC icing and ganached with dark ganache). So far, the cake feels super firm and sturdy, but this cake is a shower cake for a bride that has also ordered her huge wedding cake from me. It would be absolute disaster if this tier was crushed. I plan to stack this tier on top of a 7" round, and top the double barreled tier with a 3" round. I have planned to use my regular internal...
So the day has come...I am seriously thinking about ordering myself an Agbay this week.   I currently bake all of my cakes in 3" pans, which is super easy to split, fill, and call it a tier. But, I am really wanting my tiers to be taller... at least 4". This just can't happen as is, and I have been wanting to start baking my cakes in 2" pans, then torting those layers so that I have four layers of cake, three layers of filling. I think it would slice so lovely, and...
You need to pipe a thickened dam of buttercream around the edge. Think soft play dough consistency. I do this with doubled up piping bags and a coupler. I fill the bag then zap it in the microwave for 10 or so seconds to soften to stiff bc. Then I pipe the rope dam, then fill with regular bc. After you've filled the cake, reassemble the layer back on top, then leave on your counter wrapped loosely in saran wrap for several hours, with the cake pan that you baked those...
A six inch cake serves at least 10 servings. What is your time worth? When I first started, I felt the same way and was scared to charge more than that, because I thought "it's only a little cake!" You've got to figure out what your time is worth, then set a firm price per serving based on your costs, market value (how much are other cakes in your area being sold for?), and your time. I live in Houston, and I would charge $75 for that size cake, because that is my order...
I have a customer who would like to order a cake that is a lifesize-ish replica of a placenta. Yes, you read that right. Veiny, red, mucousy placenta. This client works in the medical field and often handles placentas, hence the wacky cake idea.   I have only found a few examples of a cake like this online, so I am turning to trusty CC'ers for answers. Specifically- how do I cover the cake in a glazed finish, so that it is super shiny and mucousy looking? Also,...
One more thing I thought of- how soon after baking are you turning them out? I wait ten minutes, and turn them out while the cake is still hot. If you wait until the cake is cooler or completely cooled, the anti-stick spray will turn into a sort of glue, and fuse the cake to the pan. Make sure you are turning them out about 10-15 minutes after they come out of the oven. 
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