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Posts by cakecoachonline

I love it - that you took the cake back.   I would have loved to see the expressions on their faces too.   Some people are so cheap aren't they.   So I guess the solution is that we must all aim for a better type of customer - hopefully who are both truthful and honest too.  Kx 
You still need to decide how long the item will take to make - and put a value on your time and charge this out too.  You also need to be aware of other costs, like petrol to go shopping, delivery costs, and if you are cooking, gas and electric (although this version is probably uncooked??)  So just charging the cost of the ingredients has given you nothing for your time, expertise, nor overheads either.    Plus you should add in a mark up to make some profit on the deal...
Ha Ha.  So the differences between UK English and USA English strikes again!!   Seriously in UK you knock up cement as well as knocking up cakes!  (We do have the other version to which you refer too - but it is not so common!)    I was watching re runs of a USA series recently and it did strike me how different our slang language is, and some things that were used on the programme, which we use really lightly, were deemed as massively offensive in USA, actually the use of...
My favourite was - 'Can you just knock me up a cake'.    Or 'my sister wants a cake, but she is a bit short of cash - so are you still making cakes?'   One thing is for sure - I DO NOT knock up cakes, neither do I make them for cash strapped people.   If they want one cheap they need to go to Costco or supermarket and fight with all the e numbers it contains.   If they want they can make it themselves, that would be classed as a knocked up cake I guess.   If they want one...
Thank you for making me laugh today.   I love the thought of cutting a square out of a round cake - and that it why it costs more.  Brilliant.  I had never thought that squares were more complicated, but I guess with fondant icing trying to get rid of the excess as you fold the edges down is slightly more time consuming perhaps.  The main thing is to know that it takes more ingredients for a square cake than a round.  My recipe book for wedding cakes shows that a square...
One of my customers did a royal iced wedding cake - which was duly delivered and accepted.  Then after the honeymoon the whole family pitched up complaining that the icing was hard and could not be cut.  The top tier was duly taken into the kitchen there and then - and easily cut with a pretty blunt knife.  My customer offered a small refund to cater for their disappointment (but was seething inside)  She heard nothing.   TWO YEARS later - she gets an email asking for the...
You need to be charging to all of your ingredients, as well as ALL of your time.  You need to know what it is that you would like to earn per hour for your labour and become totally aware of how long a cake takes, right through from consultation, to shopping, to baking, clearing the kitchen and then delivery or collection.  If you do not have the figures for the ingredients and the sundry items that you have outlayed for your contract - as well as the amount of time it...
Hi Cakey Peeps - just realised that the thread here is now incorrect.  The technology behind getting the Cake Calculator to work via a downloadable facebook app proved to be a challenge and it failed more often than it worked.  (All to do with code I understand).  So this is now available from my site.  It is getting very favourable reviews from all who use it.  Currently working on a new product too which is very exciting.  Watch this space.  My site is...
I agree, stick to your guns.  If you want cash up front for a quick order - then those are the rules.   You pay up front for buying from a supermarket or Costco.  (I know that you are purchasing there and then and can see the cake)  But provided the consultation has been done correctly and there are no misunderstandings on colour, message, size, shape etc. there should be no problem.  If customers are questioning the 'pay in full now' policy - you need to ensure that...
I am really curious - as to how many cake decorators use paid for advertising on facebook?   There are a whole range of choices - from boosting your post by paying for it, or paying for people to see your advert and paying for people to click on your advert.   Do you use this as a marketing strategy - or have you avoided it, even though you are quite active on Facebook, because it is too confusing?  Just wondering how everyone advertises their businesses.   ..:) Kx 
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