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Posts by Corrie76

Wow- I haven't posted in a VERY long time- but felt compelled to defend the honor of the humble sheet cake. Sheet cakes are mostly what I create and what people in my area are comfortable with. Many times a wedding isn't professionally catered and for let's say, the aunt of the bride, who's been charged with cutting the cake- a tiered wedding cake can be a scary proposition! I charge only slightly less for sheet cakes (compared to the tiered) so it's not a huge money...
I would ice the cake in BC and do the map in fondant, there would only be fondant on the top of the cake....and I would paint on the details, if you make a mistake while painting you can usually take a wet paper towel and gently blot/wipe away the mistake, let it dry up a bit and brush with powdered sugar to take the shine out- I'd use gel colors and a paint brush over a food doodler just so it would have that antique, hand drafted feel to it...I'm a huge Tolkien nerd so I...
sometimes you have to be careful making the darker colors because a lot of colors especially black and red will deepen over time- what looks too bright right now may get darker yet after a few hours. Good luck with your cake!
great response- I used this tactic a few weeks ago for an anniversary cake. The client wanted a wedding cake but only had a budget of 80.00...I suggested she talk to her family and see who wanted to chip in for the anniversary couple and it worked- she was able to get enough money collected to get the cake she wanted
maybe that's why I don't ever cover cakes in fondant, LOL...I guess if i had a gap issue though- I'd opt for a 3/4" wide (or maybe wider depending on gap) fondant ribbon around the base of each tier- it would affect how the design is executed a little but look cleaner. Or another fix might be to cut the cake board under each tier to just a 1/4" greater in size all around the cake and then cover the cake with fondant- making the fondant cover that little edge of cardboard...
You did great! And I know how difficult this particular design is!!! I've done it for two different weddings with two totally different color combos you can see how the color really affects the end result! I think the only adjustment, for next time you do this, is the smaller borders (like use a #5 tip) and also maybe a smaller tip size on the main scrolls that encase the 'netting' Also, another thing I do is that I very lightly "kiss" the piping with a viva paper towel-...
So this question intrigued me so much I went ahead and googled "kool-aid cake" ....turns out there's lots of folks out there that have pondered and actually tried out adding kool-aid to their cakes...I kinda half-read a few recipes and blogs here and there and sounds like it's definately a GO
straight-up traditional Kool-Aid packets don't contain sugar. Something to think about trying anyways- the main concern I'd have is if baking temps would make the absorbic acid, in the mix, bitter. I've made home-made playdough with kool-aid before and it colors and smells great but I generally don't eat playdough,
You are certainly talented enough, but Leah is correct in that 10% of a cake business is the decorating. Have you analyzed the market in your area, is there a need or is it already saturated? You have the technical skill, and if you know the business management end that only leaves the customer base and their spending habits for your location- that's the next step to investigate before you make your move.
I use 3 parts purple, 1 part brown, 1 part red...that'll get you heading in the right direction but you may have to fiddle around and adjust the color proportions to get the right shade or depth of color...HTH
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