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Posts by kmstreepey

Is this true? I've had sliced strawberries in a filling in a cake before and kept it out of the refrigerator and it was just fine. Though I normally keep my whole strawberries in the frig, I have left them out for my kids to snack on and never had a problem. They've been out a whole day before.
I've filled a cake with buttercream and fresh slice strawberries before with no problem. I put the strawberry slices, patted dry with a paper towel, right onto the cake layer so that if they do release some liquid, it will be absorbed by the cake and won't make the layers slide. I then put buttercream on top of that. I have never had a problem with my cakes getting soggy as a result (and my cakes are not dry to begin with). I have also done strawberry puree mixed into...
To really know and do substitutions for flavor successfully, you need to study and learn about baking science and how different ingredients interact with each other. You have to pay attention to the fat, sugar, and protein (eggs and flour) of the different ingredients. If you don't and you alter the balance, your recipe will fail. Acidity plays a big role, too. Remember, a successful recipe is really all about the chemistry.A good book to get your feet wet is Bakewise...
Thank you, Price! I've already started on a couple of sketches and ideas, but I'm not sure exactly what I'm going to do. The competition show is on the 22nd, so I have a little time. The rules allow cake dummies and I thought having more time to focus on getting all the decorations perfect might benefit me. My potential designs are fairly simple, but with a technique I'm working on that isn't easy and that I haven't seen before. So I'm hoping simple is okay as long as...
Do you have any advice for me? I'm planning on using cake dummies so I can take a little more time to decorate and make sure everything is perfect. Is that a good idea? Is there anything I should keep in mind through it all? I truly appreciate any advice you all can give! Thank you!!
I think it looks fine. The lighter part is probably just the edge of where those crusty bubbles were. I always used my cakes (after trimming the crusty part off) and they were fine. Actually, very moist (but totally cooked through) and chocolate-y. I think you are totally fine using that one.
I know exactly what you are talking about because it has happened to me with a chocolate cake recipe I was developing. It is like a mud cake, though I'm not entirely sure that matters. Once baked, the middle of the top would have a crust that was like bubbles had risen and set there. Is that what you have?In any case, I'm still not entirely sure why that happens, but I do not believe that it has to do with baking time or temperature. I did end up adjusting the baking...
I would say you do need the baking soda because of the vinegar, buttermilk, and cocoa. Good luck and remember to have fun with the process! Scratch baking can be challenging when you are just getting started, but it is also very rewarding. Let us know how it turns out!
Sometimes baking soda is required to counter an acidic ingredient. Red velvet usually has buttermilk in it and the baking soda may be required for that. Otherwise, the acid will prevent your cake from setting properly. So, the answer is maybe, but it depends on what other ingredients are in the recipe.Does your recipe call for both baking powder AND baking soda? If so, then this is a clue to you that the baking soda is required to counter an acidic ingredient.
I cannot imagine how horrible this would taste. Stick with real butter, the higher quality, the better!
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