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Posts by Dayti

To get the squarer shapes, I think you would have to roll out gumpaste really thin - use a pasta roller - and cut into strips then squarish shapes with a pizza cutter. They don't have to be exactly square, as you can see in the photo you provided, and they look better if they are not all flat, to get more texture. Wait for them to dry - couple of days or so on large baking sheets (or make them way ahead and store them in a cardboard box once dry), then apply like that...
I would also use ivory, and maybe a little yellow too. Adding just more ivory would get you to a caramel colour if you're not careful I think. If you Google "Pantone Champagne" and look at the images, lots of different shades will come up. There is no right way of mixing a colour...you kind of have to play around with it, according to the exact colour you are looking for or trying to match. 
I would use orange and pink. I would make up a small amount of each colour fairly deeply, and start adding this bit by bit to the white icing, until you get the colour you need. I would do this for both fondant and BC.
This document from Helene Dujardin at Tartelette is also worth a read: http://issuu.com/helened/docs/demystifyingmacarons
I can't believe I didn't think of this (well, I can actually!). I have to do a cake and cupcakes with tropical coloured BC flowers for tomorrow. I was playing around the other day and had some flowers done in plain BC - I use a crusting BC. I just got my airbrush and did a test, it works great!!!    I haven't done BC flowers for years, so I was a bit nervous piping strong colours direct on the cake/cupcakes. I think I will get on now with the flowers, let them crust,...
Can you post a picture? Does the cake have to travel somewhere? What are you using for supports? A crack in the cake, especially in the bottom tier, could very possibly lead to bigger problems, yes. I would try and take the cake apart, repair, and restack, but a photo would help us to help you.
Chilling in the freezer for 5-10 minutes at a time will help you - just don't let the cake get cold to the core before you put the fondant on. You should be able to get sharp corners no problem. It's perhaps a bit late for you to try ganache but IMO that is what works best under fondant. If the cake is white/ivory, sprinkle a little cornstarch on your counter and dip your smoothers in it and tap off any excess - this will help them stop sticking if too much condensation...
The trick to not getting cornflour everywhere is only put a small amount under your initial ball of fondant on the worktop. As you roll, the fondant will pick up the cornflour needed and spread it around by itself. Turning your fondant and sliding it over the work surface will ensure it doesn't stick, but you can add a tiny sprinkle more underneath if necessary.   Basically, don't sprinkle the cornflour all over your work surface, as it just gets all over your rolling...
Did you try stirring it gently but thoroughly, or try "paddling" it against the side of the mixer bowl with a spatula to get the air out?
(I take a long time to type - you got your answer twice, hahaha)
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