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Posts by heartsnsync

Just beware that dry ice needs to vent so the container cannot be sealed completely. The resulting carbon dioxide can become toxic to the people riding in the vehicle if you are in there very long. I did a lot of research on this recently because of a cake order I had out of state. 
I had an adventure in making a replica of a 1955 electric guitar back earlier this year. I made the base out of MDF as well as the neck of the guitar. I had an internal structure made such so that he neck of the guitar was screwed into the body area of the cake. There were also shelves spaced about 8" apart so that when the cake was placed on the guitar stand there would not be as much gravity issues. I covered the MDF with cake boards hot glued to the base. I then used...
I recently did a lot of research because I was going to have to deliver a cake 15 hours away. I found out that traveling with dry ice in a car is a huge risk. The fumes coming out from the dry ice can cause the people in the car to get sick. If you read the warnings regarding transporting dry ice you will see this information.   I ended up just freezing the cake (it was not covered in fondant) and it arrived just fine. If I were to travel six hours with a cake and it was...
You can certainly use a butter cream on red velvet and carrot cake. I occasionally have customers who say that's what they want. As for the cream cheese flavoring, you can get "Cheesecake" from Lorann Oils. I use this a lot because my home based bakery has restrictions on the use of cream cheese.
It would help the cake to stay more solid if it were refrigerated. However, I don't ever do this as I like to know that there will not be condensation problems with my cakes and their decoration. Using a cake board that is not coated may become problematic especially with cream cheese frosting. I know some people cover their cake boards with press-n-seal and I have done this in the past when I did not have a coated board on hand in the size I needed. I do not know if...
I have been decorating cakes for 22 years and still often find myself in the middle of a cake design I had put together and say to myself, "What was I thinking???" LOL I do custom design and almost all my orders are composed of components I have never done before. Just practice and learn but make sure to give yourself plenty of time to get the new technique down before it's time to make it on a customer's cake. 
This can happen if you frost the cupcakes too soon after baking, if you frosting is too soft and the cakes are a recipe that gathers moisture on top after cooling, or if it is really hot and humid. The first two problems are easily fixed by waiting a bit or adjusting your recipe. The third problem can be solved by adjusting your butter cream recipe to one adjusted for high temperatures and humidity. HTH
It is very important to use a dam when doing a tiered cake with cream cheese icing. Cream cheese icing tends to be softer than other types of icing. Without a dam it tends to allow the cake layers to slide a bit and can cause you to have shifting in transport. I have been doing cakes for 22 years. Want to guess how I found this little bit of wisdom out? Just add a lot of extra powdered sugar to your cream cheese icing and make it really stiff and then put the smooth...
For smaller tiers I bake two layers and torte. For larger tiers (12" and larger), I bake four thinner cakes. For one, I don't have to worry about the cake not getting done in the middle. Two, it bakes evenly and faster. Three, it cools faster. Four, I have less issues with the larger cake breaking when torting and layering them. Just my way of doing it. I am sure others have their methods that work just as well for them, too.
The problem is the buttercream will be much heavier than the whipped cream and gravity will take effect and could cause you some major issues. Personally, I would not take the chance,
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