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Posts by Rachel5370

Hi, I would recommend getting one 20qt Hobart ($1500 to $2000 used) and two 6 qt Commercial grade (look for NSF label) Kitchenaids or smaller commercials mixers of another brand. Unless you are doing large batches of bread dough, you don't need the huge ones. You can fit a 10-12lb batch of icing or batter in the 20qt. That makes quite a bit of cake! Then if you need to flavor of color your icing, use the smaller mixers. Get extra bowls and attachments for more flexibility...
Hi, I would recommend getting one 20qt Hobart ($1500 to $2000 used) and two 6 qt Commercial grade (look for NSF label) Kitchenaids or smaller commercials mixers of another brand. Unless you are doing large batches of bread dough, you don't need the huge ones. You can fit a 10-12lb batch of icing or batter in the 20qt. That makes quite a bit of cake! Then if you need to flavor of color your icing, use the smaller mixers. Get extra bowls and attachments for more flexibility...
The issue of home kitchen vs commercial kitchen is a food safety concern. It's not about talent, money or morality. I don't even think it's about tax evasion. I just think people should understand more about health dept regulations and food safety before they go and argue for home kitchens producing food for sale. It's not just about keeping a "clean". I have a pretty good understanding of food safety, but I have a toddler, 3 teenagers and a dog- so I don't feel confident...
Ok, coming from the perspective of someone who has worked in commercial kitchens all my life (since the age of 12) and gone to culinary school- here are my thoughts. A kitchen that appears "clean" (home or commercial) can still produce food-bourne illness laden foods. Improper heating and cooling as well as cross-contamination are the main causes of food-bourne illnesses. So are improper handwashing practices. Just like hands that look "clean" may be coated in Noro-virus...
I bought some Fond-x online once and I liked it. The problem is the Virgin White doesn't color well, it takes the color but about 15 minutes later it changes- with certain colors anyway. Pettinice is another one that is inexpensive, tastes pretty good and takes color well.
Bayside Bakeshop?
I have mixed both Chocopan and Duff's with regular fondant, in one case Pettinice and the other time Wilton's. In my opinion, it makes the PERFECT fondant when done that way. Something about mixing the chocolate based fondants with regular gives a nice smooth texture, no cracks or elephant skin, less stretching, rolls out thin and makes nice sharp edges. It tastes great too! Plus, by mixing it with regular fondant, it cuts the cost down. I discovered it by accident,...
It could take awhile, but I have asked for the official policies of Louis Vuitton and Coach. I got a reply, but not an official statement, from Louis Vuitton- and they said there are no licensing opportunities available. That means don't do L.V purse cakes! I had a customer ask for one and I said I would do a purse cake, but not L.V. ~Rachel
Hi. I am the OP of the thread on copyright infringement in cake. I posted that I would update you guys on anything I found out, but the thread is locked. LOL, does that mean I'm in trouble? I have contacted several companies whose products/images are often replicated in cake. I am still awaiting replies from most but here is what Tiffany said in an email to me:--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Good Evening Ms. .....,I received...
To the OP- I am "transitioning" from chef to cake decorator and I get what you're saying. There was no shortening in culinary school. I will be opening my shop soon and I hope not to use shortening in my icing or anything else. Chefs are trained from a "European" perspective and shortening is an American thing. But, I do live in America! I see that there are merits to using shortening and maybe that's what the general American population prefers. I use SMBC- and people...
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