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Posts by Marianna46

Cut a strip of fondant as long as the perimeter of your tier and about an inch wider than the height of the tier. Ruffle one edge, then roll the strip up. Unroll it around your cake. If you want the top of the tier covered in fondant, too, cut a circle of rolled fondant a little larger than the diameter of the cake and place it on top of the cake, smoothing the edges down the side of the cake, before you do the side. Repeat this for each tier.   Cakeyouverymuch could...
Having lived in Mexico for the last 44 years, I can tell you there are plenty of products you can trust here, Cakepro. 10X is 10X here, there and everywhere. I'll bet the bag didn't say 10X on it. I've bought 10X sugar here for years (by the kilo at my cake supply store, so I'm not sure what brand it is), but if the bag doesn't say 10X, it probably isn't.   I agree with the posters who said to use what you had as regular sugar (by weight) factoring in the cornstarch...
Here's a frozen buttercream transfer I did for a cupcake cake a few years ago:                                  The Bratz image is the transfer and the earrings and pendant were overpiped. The background was actually a different color than the doll's hair, but for some reason they came out the same in the photo. Sorry not to put this in my original post, but this is the first time I've had to look for my own photos since the big change and I couldn't find them...
I've had very little success with royal icing transfers: they tend to break when you take the backing off and, if they're not COMPLETELY dry, the just crumble up into nothing. My go-to transfer now is the frozen buttercream transfer (FBCT). When you make this transfer, the visible side is the one that goes next to the waxed paper or plastic wrap. Then you fill in the background, place the whole thing in the freezer until it's good and hard. You then place the transfer on...
Modeling chocolate is a great idea. Marzipan might work, too.
Hi, remnant3333. Yes, I find the Wilton sprays work very nicely. You can spray from close up for total coverage or from far away for a lighter coating, just as you do with an airbrush. If you're using a stencil, you need to make sure the stencil is flush up against the surface, though, or the design will come out smudged. My only objection to the Wilton sprays is that the range of colors is not very wide or appealing.
Very lovely cake, doramoreno!
It's hard to tell exactly what size the piping is, but it looks like a star tube (Wilton nos. 13-21, depending on size). If the star shapes are really big, try the 1M (the cupcake froster).
Sorry to say, I have no answers, just questions like you. But I'd be really interested in anything anybody has to say about using an airbrush. I bought mine over a year ago and haven't had the courage to try it yet. It seems so daunting - so many little pieces! I love the effects you can get from it and the deep colors. I've used the Wilton Color Mists a lot, so I'm not afraid of spraying, just of putting the thing together and taking it apart to clean it. I've found...
Bake today, as early as possible. After removing my cakes from their pans, I always wrap them in a couple of layers of plastic wrap and freeze them, at least overnight, because I find it helps them retain moisture, but you can decide for yourself if you want to do this. If you do freeze it, take it out early so it will have time to thaw. Don't unwrap it until the condensation has evaporated from the plastic wrap. Even if you don't want to freeze it, bake today. Cakes...
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