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Posts by Marianna46

I don't know what you need to tell her. That depends on whether you still want to be friends with her afterward, I guess. But you should DEFINITELY get out of that situation. The woman is too flaky to run a successful business and she'll just end up getting you involved in her screw-ups. Do you really need that? I guess you could try setting down some ground rules about how you work, but it sounds to me like she's treating you like she's doing you a favor by hiring you,...
Oh, lord, and I complain when the thermometer gets above 30 (yes, Celsius - don't get all freaked out all you people who live where there's snow - that's just below 90°F).
You're right about not every recipe allowing for alcohol being added ad libitum, lilmissbakesalot! But so far the WASC recipe (which, of course, isn't a scratch cake but a doctored cake mix) has been able to handle everything I've thrown at it. I'm sure I'll hit the wall with it someday, but it hasn't happened so far.
Ah, a lovely cake. So glad everything went well. I was following this thread with bated breath, although I didn't have a clue as to what might happen!
Good point, Jenn123. And something I don't always remember!
If you could travel with separate tiers and stack them when you get there, it would probably be easier all around. I wouldn't freeze them after they're ganached, because the condensation that forms as they thaw can be a problem. My experienced is that once a cake is ganached, or frosted or covered with fondant, it is sealed and it stays fresh and moist for three or four days, at least. And that's in the hot, humid climate I live in. Not sure what the weather's like in...
I defy anyone to tell me the difference between a cake that's been frozen and one that hasn't in a blind taste test. Well, gee, that sure sounded confrontational! I really didn't mean to be that aggressive, just to say that they taste fine unless they've been frozen for a really long time. Freezing overnight or for a day or two not only doesn't alter the taste and texture (if you wrap them carefully before freezing, that is) but it also helps keep them moist. I have no...
I'm sure your cake will be a masterpiece, and of course your son will love it because it's just what he wanted. If you haven't made gelatin bubbles before, good luck with them. Once you get the hang of them, they're easy, but I found them very difficult to master (it might have just been me, of course!). My best advice for them is to anchor the balloons  to toothpicks with duct tape before dipping them and then sticking the toothpicks in styrofoam (spaced pretty far...
I often just substitute all or most of the liquid for the alcohol I want to use. I made a great Bailey's cake from the basic WASC recipe. I wanted a stronger flavor, though, so I also bathed the layers in Bailey's and then put Bailey's buttercream (my standard BC recipe using Bailey's for the liquid). It's the gelatin bubble cake in my gallery - the one with the nice, pretty Bailey's color. Boy was it yummy! I think lilmissbakesalot's idea of bathing your layers in the...
Well, actually scratch vs. mix DOES come into question here, not as a judgmental thing (I do both, so I have no opinion on this), but because commercial cake mixes have a lot more leavening in them than scratch recipes do, so they tend to dome more. I've baked at lower temps and used bake-even strips and the press-down method for cakes coming out of the oven, and all of them help. Even so, I find I generally have to level most of my cakes to some degree, except for one...
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