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Posts by tracey1970

I've done it too - no prep required.
I've used Sharpies on fondant pieces that I know will NOT be eaten (I am at the party and don't allow anyone to eat them). However, I have found that lines made with Sharpies will actually "spread" and get very "fuzzy" and distort into something that is not what I initially drew. Most edible writers I've used have better staying power and don't smudge or go foggy.
Besides buttercream piping, I have done letters in royal icing (sometimes tracing a pattern of a letter shape I like under waxed paper). I also really like using tappits, patchwork and JEM cutters, clickstix, etc. - all of which are fondant/gumpaste cutters. Some people have the Cricut cake machine and use it to form letters and shapes too.
I use one (doctored) cake mix for the ball pan - half the batter in each half of the pan. Never had an issue with that.
My Wilton teacher told us the same. When we were asked to use those sealed packages of Wilton fondant, she told us to sit on them during our drive to the lesson so they would be pliable when we got there.
I've never found that I needed to do much else with the tappits except tap them against the counter (sometimes a little harder than other times...)The patchwork and JEM cutters were a pain in that they recommend using a hat pin to pick out the letters, so there is often some damage to the letter. I should try the cling wrap thing with these! The letters I use, though, are very thin and small. Not sure whether I'd get much letter out of it with clingwrap in the cutter as...
Never used them - I use tappits or clickstix. I have used patchwork cutters too, but they are a bit more tricky.I have had success with the above cutters mostly because I roll out my fondant mixed with gumtex or plain gumpaste on corn starch, roll it VERY thin (see through kind of thin), let it sit for a few minutes to dry up a bit, and then use the cutters.The patchwork cutters are much like the Wilton ones, where you have to pick the letters out, and they seem to get...
I like using Fondarific, and I have just found out that my "local" retailer (Golda's Kitchen in Mississauga, which is still a two-hour drive from my home) is no longer carrying it. I can get it on-line via many US sites, but the shipping costs are usually very high. Because the Canadian and US dollars are relatively the same, there's not a big currency conversion difference. I have used Satin Ice very successfully. I lost an entire tub of Chocopan when I laid it on a...
I have done the royal icing lettering on buttercream and it was fine (same day application). I have had royal icing pieces break down on buttercream before, but that's after a couple of days.I am terrible writing on cakes too. I also don't have the Cricut cutter, which a lot of people use for interesting lettering. I have lots of tappits, patchwork cutters, and have ordered some clikstix for a variety of letter styles and sizes. I have also used cookie cutters for big...
I wonder how you could easily bite into a cupcake that has a layer of royal icing (even runny royal icing) on it? Wouldn't that still be quite hard and crunchy? I've never tried it - just wondering...
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