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Posts by snarkybaker

I opened our first shop in February 2008.
  Here is an excellent example of what  does "NOT" qualify as professional. Poor woman bought a birthday cake cake from a little jobbyist on Facebook.   https://www.facebook.com/cakes.infinity?fref=ts   The cake had NOTHING in the way of supports, and needless to say collapsed. The party venue told her to call us. She brought it in and we pretty much rebuilt it from scratch for the bargain price of $250. We documented what we did with pictures so she could go back...
Meh, I made about $170,000 in profit after all was said and done last year, so you can make a completely decent living if you're willing to work like a professional.
My advice would be that if you really love doing cake, don't start doing it as a business. It will, at some point, suck all the joy out of it. Once you get successful, you'll spend more time working on your website, you accounting, returning emails, and other ancillary projects by far than in your kitchen. You'll end up making cakes that you hate because the money is good. You'll spend endless amounts of time explaining why you can't donate cake to virtually every Cub...
Right, but there are  about 400 supportive things you can say without "embellishing" the truth.   How about " OMG, I know, I had heartburn for a week before my first wedding cake delivery."  Or, " I know, I could make cake all day, but once you put it in the car I'm a nervous wreck" or "That was so generous of you to make a wedding cake for your friends' wedding."   This is a very sad byproduct of a generation who got ribbons and trophies just for showing up. And,...
We call them " Jobbyists". Hobbyists who have decided they are good enough to make it their job. http://www.sugarlandchapelhill.com/blog/wedding-tip-week-6/
Like I said, I don't mean anything by it. I think that there are different standards for different occasions and events.     I just don't think you help anyone get better when you look at a cake that is 1- clearly leaning to the left, 2- each tier is a different height, 3- the buttercream isn't smooth, and 4- has some weird airbrush effect going on and say " Bravo, you!"    If you did it for friends and they were happy with it, so be it. The bigger issue at hand is...
I really don't mean this to be in any way hurtful, but that cake really doesn't look very professional, and I think all of you are doing a disservice to the original poster by not giving honest feedback. I see resumes and portfolios all the time, and if someone sent me a portfolio with that cake in it, there is no way in the world I would consider letting that person make cakes professionally.    Having respect for what you do means being honest enough with yourself to...
I guess it depends on how you run your business. We have a marketing budget of 11% of gross revenue. That's the money I spend looking for business. So, if I get a guaranteed number of weddings that had none of that marketing cost, the discount is about a toss up. One of the places we have an exclusive is about 800 yards out the back door of our shop, so I don't any delivery costs either. The other builds in $8 per serving for cake, no matter what the bride picks, and most...
Mmmmm...We have a couple of venues who give us an exclusive, and so we give them a $1.50 per serving discount. We quote the bride our regular price, and then send the wholesale invoice directly to the venue at the discounted rate. I consider us to be a supplier to the hotel, and they can sell the cake to the bride for whatever they want.  It's called a commission and it's pretty standard business practice. 
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