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Posts by mjpbmf

My in-laws are having their 50th Wedding Anniversary in July. I have offered to take care of the cake for them. What they don't know is that I am going to try to recreate their original cake. The problem is that I only have this one grainy picture and I can't get enough detail off of it. I was trying to research "1960's" wedding cakes but can't find anything. If anyone can analyze this and/or make any suggestions as to what you believe the design is I would greatly...
agentdorkfish don't hesitate or be afraid to use fondant/gumpaste. Sugar is a great medium to work with and somewhat forgiveable. Good luck and can't wait to see what you come up with!
agentdorkfish don't hesitate or be afraid to use fondant/gumpaste. Sugar is a great medium to work with and somewhat forgiveable. Good luck and can't wait to see what you come up with!
I also use salted butter in everything. I think it counteracts with the sweetness to give it balance.
I need ideas for a graduation cake. The only thing they specified was that he likes trucks, ford trucks. Any ideas???
Good to know. . . like I said, it was something I heard but I have never had to try it!
If I am trying to get my cake to look really smooth I will place it in the refrigerator for an hour or so to "firm" up. Then I will to the warm spatula trick. Another thing that helps with my buttercream is to let it mix for about 10 minutes as fast as my mixer will go. Also, I think someone suggested adding corn starch to the buttercream for added stability. Not sure if this is something you already are doing or not. Just keep practicing and find something that...
The pictures I looked up show about three different variations:1. Built from pretzel rods (I would construct using royal icing)2. Built from graham cracker or gingerbread type 3. Carved out of cake and covered in fondant and/or buttercream.If you see one that you really like in the galleries, I would suggest IM'ing the owner and ask how they did it.Good luck!
Not sure but I would just go ahead and try a "test" cake. Add about 8 oz. of sour cream and see how it turns out. My mom is infamous for her moist cakes and I don't think she has ever used a formal recipe - just throws things together. She usually adds 8 oz. of cream cheese to her cakes and they always turn out so moist and delicious! Good luck!!
I would also suggest maybe blowing a small fan on the cakes as they come to room temperature to disperse the humidity caused by the temperature change. Also, I heard that if you place them in a regular old cardboard box this will also help "suck" up some of the moisture. Is it possible to put each in a seperate air tight container? Or put each in a cake box and then wrap heavily in plastic wrap?Good luck and let us know how it goes!
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